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“Let There Be Light”

By Rev. Kelly Ryan, Senior Pastor

The Table:  United Church of Christ of La Mesa (5940 Kelton Ave.  La Mesa, CA 91942)

 

 

Our Advent theme this year is the first thing God speaks of, in the first lines of the book of Genesis.

God’s first utterance—“Let there be light”

God’s first utterance, and then God sees that it is good.

Over and over, God sings to a new creation: good, good, very good.

 

We were formed in a primordial goodness.

 

But our world does not always feel that way, does it?

Our world can feel broken, twisted, and bleak sometimes.

 

And Advent doesn’t deny that brokenness.

Advent is a season that is honest with how screwed up things can be,

but does not dwell in despair.

Advent invites us onto an ancient, well-trod path that leads, unfailingly,

towards a light breaking into our world as reliably as the morning dawn.

The dawn of new beginnings,

The dawn of unlikely hope,

The dawn of justice and righteousness flowing like water in parched land.

This dawn comes in a tiny, fragile baby who is also,

somehow,

the wisdom and power of the universe.

 

Even in deepest shadow, when we can’t see our way forward,

God’s goodness breaks in like the one constant force in our universe—

 

Light.

 

Have you ever noticed how something unremarkable can be transformed into something beautiful if the light catches it right?

A broken bottle can be trash, or a stained-glass window.

A gray ocean turns turquoise blue.

A face, as we say, is “lit up” with a smile.

 

Perhaps our hurting world can be beautiful too.

When the light catches it.

 

I hope you join us for our Advent journey as we live into God’s first invitation:

 

“Let there be light.”

 

(Advent services at The Table:  10am, Dec. 2, 9, 16 & 23)

I am indebted to the poem “Light, at Thirty-two” by Michael Blumenthal for inspiration; I am reading his words on my office wall as I write this. Check out his whole poem sometime online.

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